Music Muse

The MUSE Mix: Volume II

Michael Athey introduces The MUSE Mix: Volume II, the next instalment of our fortnightly music round up series.

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Image Credit: Lou Jasmine (edited by Alex Thompson)

Welcome to volume two of The Muse Mix! It has been another two weeks, and we’ve got another stellar selection of fifteen songs that have been grabbing our attention. Ranging from older established artists like Daft Punk and The Doors, to newer upcoming artists such as Sneaks and Yazmin Lacey, we have a musical buffet that is bound to have something that will appeal to you. Take a listen - https://open.spotify.com/playlist/69zJThTcksfng4OkVuYJeQ?si=YAZ8aUaQTlWDk_SB_wgVMA - enjoy!

‘I’m Goin Down’ - Bruce Springsteen:
Whilst in the process of reviewing Springsteen’s latest release, I have also been constantly dropping the needle of my record player onto The Boss’s certified classic album, Born In The USA. All the songs on here are instantly memorable and sound like lead singles and ‘I’m Goin Down’ is no exception. I’m really enjoying Springsteen’s slightly more monotone vocal performance on this track and the repetitive line of ‘I’m Goin Down’ can’t help but suit the context of us all sinking through lockdown.

Michael Athey, Deputy Music Editor

'Drunk Drivers Killer Whales’ - Car Seat Headrest:
An absolute gem that I always find myself coming back to and finding even more to love in Will Toledo's rough and raw vocals and the blistering instrumental. If you haven't heard of Car Seat Headrest and you're into indie rock, go give it a spin - you won't be disappointed.

Alex Thompson, Social Media Director

‘Hello It's Me’ - Todd Rundgren:
This jazzy 70s ballad never fails to get me dancing around the kitchen. The chaotic mixture of saxophones, trumpets, pianos, organs, drums and pop vocals make for a surprisingly uplifting breakup song. Quite frankly, music like this is the only thing getting me through the second lockdown.

Kristina Wemyss, Music Editor

‘Yesterday’ - Loyle Carner:
Carner’s new song ‘Yesterday’ talks about the discrimination in the world currently, and shows how very little has changed over the last hundred years. Being Loyle Carner it is profoundness mixed in with beautiful beats, and I'm left hoping the release of ‘Yesterday’
means another album is coming soon.

Cara Lee, Sub Editor

‘Not Today Mate’ - Yazmin Lacey:
Chilled out jazz has been keeping me productive as time increasingly loses meaning over the prevailing lockdown. Lacey’s laidback beat is the perfect soundtrack for dreary, slow-moving winter days as her lyrics of surmounting a draining relationship elicit some positive vibes.

Charlotte Lear, Food and Drink Editor

‘Rivers and Roads’ - The Head and the Heart:
A pretty old track now but always gives me 'staring out a window while it's raining' music video vibes. Nice bit of mellow folk rock for winter. Particularly effective paired with a gloomy evening walk to co-op.

Jenna Luxon, Muse Editor

‘Edge of Midnight’ - Miley Cyrus ft Stevie Nicks:
I loved this song first time round, but add the absolute legend that is Stevie Nicks and it is the perfect collab. ‘Midnight Sky’ gave me such 'Edge of Seventeen' vibes so the merging of the two songs is one of the best things to come out of 2020. Such a vibe and also a perfect one to add to a running or workout playlist.

Kristen Murray, Deputy Features Editor

‘I’m gonna be (500 miles)’ - Sleeping At Last:
This cover of the Proclaimers track is slow, emotional and breathes new life into some iconic lyrics. I find it both haunting and calming in the best possible way - and it’s perfect for relaxing and de-stressing during lockdown.

Hannah Carley, Deputy Arts Editor

‘Never Enough’ - Rex Orange County:
As a student house we often play this one during car karaoke. Very relatable when it speaks of not leaving one’s house in a while and about how one wants to make their family proud but hasn’t seen them in a while.

Ed Halford, Politics Editor

‘She's Not There’ - The Zombies:
At the moment I'm in love with the soundtrack of Netflix series The Queen's Gambit, which has got me listening to tons of 60s hits. In just over two minutes, this song, reminiscent of early Beatles numbers, perfectly captures the bashful ebullience that preceded the "Swinging Sixties". A perfect track for your nostalgic side!

Alice Manning, Features Editor

‘Touch Me’ - The Doors:
Teleports you back to the clubs of Hollywood in the late 60s/early 70s. Ray Manzarek's punchy chords on the keyboard at the start combined with the trumpets create an incredible intro. Layered with the lizard king's simple but effective lyrics make it a great energy booster for a day in Morrell or gearing up for a run. One of their more uplifting songs and still has the same brilliant instrumentals.

Barney Andrews, Business Editor

‘Beautiful Faces’ - Declan McKenna:
This song would be so great to see performed live and listening to it just gets me into a more lively, energetic mood. It makes me reminisce about nights out and fun times with friends and gives me hope for a return to normality in the future!

Emily Harvie, Deputy Muse Editor

‘PBNJ’ - Sneaks:
Sneaks is an artist I discovered only recently. Her merging of dark post punk guitar and bass lines alongside groovy hip hop drum beats is a combination that has instantly captured my attention. ‘PBNJ’, is a track that shows both of these elements of her sound as well as giving us these dreamy vocals that surf over the top to transcend it all. Also with lines like “Something about you, gets me up on my feet” potentially being about peanut butter and jelly, Sneak's amusing side comes through too.

Michael Athey, Deputy Music Editor

'Something About Us' - Daft Punk:
This song is perfect and I find myself coming back to it time and time again and loving it more. Beautiful instrumental, incredible production and all round vibes - a timeless classic.

Alex Thompson, Social Media Director

‘No Halo’ - Brockhampton:
This song has been the soundtrack to many of my dark winter walks home from the library. The simple guitar backing fits each of the reflective verses perfectly- its cathartic hip-hop at its finest.

Kristina Wemyss, Music Editor

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