General Elections Party Profiles Politics

Conservatives

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Seemingly back from the political abyss after three successive General Election defeats, David Cameron's rebranded "Compassionate Conservatism" has clawed back support for the Conservatives over the past few years, with opinion polls putting the party's national lead over Labour between four and eight percent.

Given the revised constituency boundaries being adopted in the coming election, it's estimated that the Conservatives will require around a 4% greater share of the vote to win a national majority than Labour.

Key to the Conservative manifesto are; commitments to accountability and localization. Any petition with over 100,000 signatories will be eligible for debate in Parliament, and voters will be given the ability to sack their MP.

The Conservatives have stated their intention to prioritise reducing the national deficit immediately upon taking power, rather than continuing to support the economy through deficit spending. They intend to produce an Emergency Budget within fifty days of taking office. £6 billion of "wasteful departmental spending" has been identified by the Conservatives, and they also intend to reduce spending elsewhere.

Although they have indicated their intent to slash Government Spending across the board, they have stated their commitment to increasing spending on the NHS in real terms every year. They also intend to allow citizens to obtain private care on the NHS.

The Conservatives pledge to raise the primary threshold for paying National Insurance by £24 a week, and raise the secondary threshold at which employers begin paying National Insurance by £21 a week. Any new business with ten or fewer employees will pay no Employers' National Insurance during its first year. They also oppose Labour's proposed Jobs Tax, and support the abolition of the default retirement age.

The party pledges to "make Britain one of the easiest places in the world to start a business", by abolishing tax on new jobs for the first two years of a Conservative administration, reducing the bureaucracy entailed in setting up new businesses, and cutting Corporation Tax.

In a radical shake-up of the benefits system, all current claimants of Incapacity Benefit will be reassessed under a Conservative Government. Long-term unemployment benefit claimants will be required to "work for the dole" on community programmes.

An annual limit on the number of non-EU economic migrants is also proposed, along with measures to ensure that foreign students intending to change course will be usually be obliged to leave the country and reapply.

The Conservative Parliamentary Candidate for York Outer is Julian Sturdy- a By notional estimates, he requires a 4.5% swing (1,821 votes) from the Liberal Democrats to win the seat.

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2 Comment

Stelhan Ariyadasa-Saez Posted on Sunday 18 Aug 2019

*blinks*
My name appears to have shed a few letters there.

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Ali Clark Posted on Sunday 18 Aug 2019

Apologies, corrected now :)

Reply

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