Comment YUSU Elections 2018

Avoiding empty promises

If voting on appearance is what you usually do, check the small print and make sure there's no plastic surgery scheduled for them that term.

Archive This article is from our archive and might not display correctly. Download PDF
This year's YUSU elections are drawing ever closer with each candidate itching to get ahead of the campaign game. YUSU President, Sports President and Services and Democracy Officer are just a few of the titles up for grabs. The York students in the race for these positions are willing to dedicate themselves full-time to help to improve the experience of the populace at York University.

With so many dedicated leaders fighting for glory and responsibility, who to vote for and trust is a surprisingly hard decision. Promising smiles are enough to win votes, yet infectious personalities must be treated with caution, and will they deliver?

When you order a gigantic pizza from Efes, most of the time you know what your getting: a big cheap cheesy delight that prevents you from doing any cooking and satisfies your hunger perfectly. When the delivery man turns up with a small salad, you know something has gone terribly awry.

Yet it happens to the electorate; York students vote in YUSU elections after hearing and reading the menus of the enthusiastic campaigners and at times aren't sure if they will get the roast dinner or the sorbet.

Tom Scott was voted YUSU President on the basis he was crazy pirate persona 'Mad Cap'n Tom' on all occasions. Offering in exchange polices for an on-campus chemist and for 'all YUSU officers t'be trained in sword fighting.' Scott got to an an encouraging start when he put his cannon on Central Hall. Yet has failed to deliver on any other promises. He did not play his part as Mad Cap'n Scott in events such as the Langwith bar opening; arguably defeating the validity of his role. He stated "I'm required to act in the best interests of the Union at all times. That doesn't mean the Mad Cap'n's being retired though" Unfortunately that's exactly what it does mean, and every time we see him in a suit we feel a bitter let down in our hearts.

So if voting on appearance is what you usually do, check the small print and make sure there's no plastic surgery scheduled for them that term.

Successful candidates do, however, deliver on occasion. YUSU Services and Finance Officer Matt Burton promised a student-run bar in his manifesto, and when The Courtyard was revealed students were delighted at what Burton had help achieve. It cost £500,000 and took a long six months; but it was fulfilled. "It shows what you can do with a bit of effort and a bit of money."

If you want to vote for candidates pushing for more student entertainment, make sure the person is realistic in their aims, and not dreaming they have a billion to spend.

With a bit of effort Alex Lacy is fulfilling his aims as Sports President. He turned the AU into York Sport. He gave sport at York a new identity, resulting in a unity and amalgamation of sporting minds - whatever that means. So don't vote on what sounds intellectual, make sure you know exactly what the change will be.

The past teaches us that leaders say what the people want to hear. Realistic aims are worth voting for. If you want the campus lake to turn into a gorgeous heated pool you could be waiting a while. Think about who genuinely wants to change things for the benefit of York students, and don't let the glitter fool you.

You Might Also Like...

4 Comment

jules 88 Posted on Sunday 18 Aug 2019

i like this article! thanks for the advice

Reply

Alex Lacy Posted on Sunday 18 Aug 2019

"[Alex Lacy] gave sport at York a new identity, resulting in a unity and amalgamation of sporting minds - whatever that means. So don't vote on what sounds intellectual, make sure you know exactly what the change will be".

Natasha, you have apologised to me in person for writing this- so thank you. However, you elaborated that the reason it was included was because you felt there had to be something negative in the article for it to be credible.

Yes, I've helped do this. It means being more attractive to sponsors, more University spirit, and more co-operation amongst clubs. Only today there was an open martial arts session with clubs sharing technique and practice: and I had no hand in this. You have dumped on our success without explanation or justification.

I fear that you have jumped on the bandwagon of criticism because it's an easy ride and you lack the courage to go against the grain and comment with fairness. I may be wrong. Would you care to expand on your dismissal of club unity as an empty construct?

Reply

Dan Hyde Posted on Sunday 18 Aug 2019

Alex, having read your response to Natasha's article, I feel that you may have misunderstood her message. A "unity and amalgamation of sporting minds" can point towards a variety of unspecified meanings, I'm sure you will agree, and I think the point is that voters should be wary of wordy, vague promises. I don't even think she is suggesting that you didn't expand on this in your election manifesto, nor does her article suggest you haven't fulfilled your promises - it is simply a warning to voters not to be fooled by unrealistic idealism expressed through airy terms (such as "amalgamation of sporting minds") without further clarification.

I hope that makes some sense, as I don't believe this was a direct criticism.

DH

Reply

Alex Lacy Posted on Sunday 18 Aug 2019

Dan,

Nat talked to me about the article before Wednesday's hustings, and apologised for writing a critical piece. Before she apologised I had not clocked it was her who wrote the article, but she seemed in no doubt that is was critical (Nat, please dive in if I'm talking out my arse).

To be honest, what she wrote was nowhere near the worst thing I've had written about me or York Sport over the last year. What irked me was that she seemed to have no real justification for the criticism, except for the admission that at Nouse HQ 'all articles need a critical element for them to be credible'.

Hold us to account by all means, but there shouldn't be any pressure on Nouse journalists to slip unjustified negativity into their articles. At any rate, when reporters are critical without argument or evidence they should expect to evoke the (purely professional) wrath of those they are dumping on.

Reply

Leave a comment

Disclaimer: this page is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.